5 Observations from Microsoft Build 2016

Microsoft’s Build conference for 2016 took place a couple of weeks ago, and true to form, there were a number of killer announcements and reveals for a number of services, tools, and frameworks, many of which are available today.  Not one to ever really post something when it’s actually relevant, here are a few of the things that jumped out at me from the event. Continue reading “5 Observations from Microsoft Build 2016” »

Power BI iOS app

Impressions of Microsoft’s new-look Power BI

A couple of months ago, Microsoft’s new-look Power BI Preview rolled out globally.  Ditching the Office 365/Sharepoint Online requirement, the new Power BI is a streamlined, simplified version of the product that attempts to lose some of the bloat and give users a focussed, easy-to-use, self-service BI platform.

So has it worked?

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Case sensitivity in SSIS Lookup Transformation

Something that catches out a lot of new SSIS developers.  The caching mode used for a Lookup Transformation may affect case sensitivity.

The Full Cache option is case sensitive by default.  Partial and No-cache options use the Collation setting of the database (or table) to handle case.

Of course, using Partial or No-caching results in the SSIS package issuing a call to the database for each row in the data flow, so use them wisely!

Office 365 Team Site homepage

Power BI for Office 365 first thoughts

I’ve been meaning to write something on Power BI for a long time now, and I’m a little late in getting round to writing this, as most of the dust has already settled after Microsoft sent out the first round of invites to the Power BI for Office 365 preview, and a lot of people have produced some amazing work with Power BI.  Chris Webb has written a pretty comprehensive review on his blog, as have countless others.

What is Power BI?

For anyone living under a rock (or new to the world of MS BI), Power BI is a new offering from Microsoft which makes their new Excel-based self-service BI tools shareable and collaborative in a way that was previously only available for organisations rocking a SharePoint Enterprise installation.  By hooking their toolkit up to Office 365, they’re providing a cloud-based ecosystem in which to share, manage and explore data, using their suite of data tools: Power Query (formerly Data Explorer), Power Pivot (formerly PowerPivot), Power View, and Power Map (formerly GeoFlow).  If you want to know a bit more, I’ve got a more detailed post on the included functionality in Power BI for Office 365. Continue reading “Power BI for Office 365 first thoughts” »

Fix “login failed” error while editing Table Properties in SSAS Tabular via Visual Studio

Just a quick post regarding a strange problem I encountered while working on an SSAS Tabular model project.  Built on the same Vertipaq technology as Power Pivot, it’s very easy to get started and produce quick, efficient data models.  Unlike Power Pivot, which runs as an Excel add-in, SSAS Tabular models are developed in Visual Studio via the SQL Server Data Tools (SSDT) Business Intelligence add-on.  However, once you load up the development environment, it’s almost exactly the same, the only difference really being that when you build a tabular model in VS, it is developed against a temporary cube on a pre-installed SSAS Tabular instance.  Power Pivot just works entirely in memory, without requiring an SSAS instance.

Continue reading “Fix “login failed” error while editing Table Properties in SSAS Tabular via Visual Studio” »