SQL Server example of datetime and datetime2

Mapping C# DateTime to SQL Server datetime2 via SSIS

With SQL Server 2008, Microsoft introduced the new, improved datetime2 format.  This newer time storage format is great, because it takes up less storage space, plus you have control over precision and can define your field to the exact specification required.  Database columns defined as datetime2 can be mapped in SSIS by using the DT_DBTIMESTAMP2 type.  However, in the scenario where you may have a Script Transformation in your SSIS package, and want to assign a .NET DateTime type to a Data Flow column that is mapped to a datetime2 field, you might encounter a DoesNotFitBufferException.

The reason for this is likely down to your specified field precision, and is easily fixed. Continue reading “Mapping C# DateTime to SQL Server datetime2 via SSIS” »

Case sensitivity in SSIS Lookup Transformation

Something that catches out a lot of new SSIS developers.  The caching mode used for a Lookup Transformation may affect case sensitivity.

The Full Cache option is case sensitive by default.  Partial and No-cache options use the Collation setting of the database (or table) to handle case.

Of course, using Partial or No-caching results in the SSIS package issuing a call to the database for each row in the data flow, so use them wisely!

SSIS OLE DB source using table or view access mode

Optimising SSIS to read from a view using OLE DB Source

I’ve really been neglecting the blog of late and have been taking a bit of a break from a lot of extra curricular business intelligence and data reading.  I figured it was about time to get back to posting though, and as luck would have it, my colleague Stephen came to me with an interesting SSIS performance issue that presented the perfect opportunity for a quick blog post. I’ve not written much about SSIS lately, having been drawn off by the shiny sparkle of developments in the self-service BI sector such as Power BI, and playing with Big Data tools like Hadoop.  But I still do a lot of work with SSIS and it’s still my go-to large scale ETL tool. Continue reading “Optimising SSIS to read from a view using OLE DB Source” »

Browse SSAS Tabular model in SSMS

Fix “login failed” error while editing Table Properties in SSAS Tabular via Visual Studio

Just a quick post regarding a strange problem I encountered while working on an SSAS Tabular model project.  Built on the same Vertipaq technology as Power Pivot, it’s very easy to get started and produce quick, efficient data models.  Unlike Power Pivot, which runs as an Excel add-in, SSAS Tabular models are developed in Visual Studio via the SQL Server Data Tools (SSDT) Business Intelligence add-on.  However, once you load up the development environment, it’s almost exactly the same, the only difference really being that when you build a tabular model in VS, it is developed against a temporary cube on a pre-installed SSAS Tabular instance.  Power Pivot just works entirely in memory, without requiring an SSAS instance.

Continue reading “Fix “login failed” error while editing Table Properties in SSAS Tabular via Visual Studio” »

Screenshot showing chart editing in SSRS Report Builder

5 Reasons why PowerView can’t replace Reporting Services

The other week I wrote a post discussing how PowerView was the future of SQL Server Reporting Services, and the killer features that made it a compelling choice.  Despite the numerous positive advances that PowerView brings to Microsoft/SQL-based reporting, there are of course a number of counter arguments.  I deliberately left these out in order to look at some of these reasons in a later post.

As such, here are five reasons why PowerView, despite all its pizzazz, is simply not capable (in its current form) of replacing the venerable SSRS. Continue reading “5 Reasons why PowerView can’t replace Reporting Services” »